University of Otago.Department of Physiology.Department of Physiology.

Physiology TV

An overview of Physiology at the University of Otago.

News

17th May, 2018

BMS Postgraduate Colloquium

Congratulations to all the students who presented at the BMS Postgraduate Colloquium this week.

11th April, 2018

PCOS research featured in the news

The latest exciting findings from Assoc Prof Rebecca Campbell's lab into the role of brain signalling in polycystic ovary syndrome was featured on RadioNZ on 10th April.

14th March, 2018

Is a man's grey matter the same as a woman's? The documentary features Professor Allan Herbison and Dr Jenny Clarkson and was made with the support of NZ on Air.

9th February, 2018

Dahlia based diabetes drug developed by Physiology researcher ready for human trials

In partnership with Plant and Food Research, researchers will soon begin human trials of a drug made from dahlias.

9th January, 2018

Otago breakthrough in diabetic heart disease

The molecule responsible for heart disease in diabetics has been identified by University of Otago researchers, greatly improving chances of survival.

Next Event

2nd July, 2018

Dr Justin Deniset (University of Calgary)

 
PhD Programme.

Seminars

Unless stated otherwise, Departmental Seminars are held in the Hercus D'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00 on the day specified.

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 2nd July 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Justin Deniset (University of Calgary)

Visualising the inflammatory response during infection and tissue injury

Inflammation is the body’s normal physiological response to injury. The cause of tissue damage can be attributed to infection and/or sterile injury (e.g. trauma, ischemia/reperfusion, chemical contact). The inability to resolve the injury or infection in a timely manner can lead to chronic inflammatory activation, which is the basis for a variety of human diseases such as cancer, heart failure, atherosclerosis and liver diseases. Employing imaging modalities with mouse models, we study how cells of the innate immune system contribute to tissue specific inflammatory processes. Using this approach we identify new resident immune cells in the spleen and pericardial cavity that are critical for systemic bacterial clearance and modulating cardiac remodeling following injury, respectively. Understanding how immune cells behave in these complex tissue environments provides valuable information for the development of immune modulatory strategies to treat disease.

Department of Physiology

Monday, 9th July 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Oby Ebenebe (Department of Physiology PhD student, Final presentation)

The Role of 17β-Estradiol and CaMKII In The Advancement Of Atherosclerotic Plaques

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) has been highlighted as the main cause of death among cardiovascular diseases, due to development and progression of plaques resulting in major adverse cardiovascular events. The multifactorial processes resulting in the generation of plaques have been established, and anti-atherogenic effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) shown. Yet recent evidence has shown the adverse or lack of effect of E2 treatment on ASCVD in postmenopausal women and pre-clinical models of ASCVD. Key signalling factors that modulate vascular cell proliferation and inflammation underlie plaque advancement, including the nodal multifunctional calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). There is a sex-related difference in the activation profile of CaMKII in cardiac pathologies, yet its role in plaque progression, which leads to ASCVD, is unknown. This talk will address the potential mechanisms driving the E2-induced advancement of atherosclerotic plaques using the murine model of atherosclerosis, Apolipoprotein E- deficient (ApoE-/-) mice. The association of CaMKII with E2-induced effects and the specific role of CaMKII in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis will be discussed with a focus on plaque calcification.

Department of Physiology

Monday, 16th July 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

A/P Daryl Schwenke ( Department of Physiology)

TBA

Department of Physiology

Sunday, 22nd July 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Jason Lew (Department of Physiology, PhD Student, Final presentation)

The effect of exercise on diabetic heart disease

Exercise has been recommended for the improvement of cardiovascular health in type-2 diabetes. However, what exercise intensity is more effective at preventing or reversing the progression of diabetic heart disease (DHD) in individuals with different severity of diabetes remains controversial. Therefore, the overarching aim of my PhD was to investigate the effect of various exercise intensities on the diabetic heart function and structure in a diabetic db/db mouse model. My primary findings suggest that moderate- and high-intensity exercise are equally effective at preventing the onset of DHD when initiated at the early stages of diabetes, while moderate-intensity exercise appears to be insufficient once cardiac dysfunction has become well-established. Importantly, with the incorporation of miR analysis, my findings also suggest that miR may be a good prognostic marker of DHD, and may, at least in part, contribute to the observed exercise-induced cardioprotection.

Department of Physiology

Monday, 30th July 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Joanne Harrison (Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology)

TBA

Department of Physiology

Monday, 6th August 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Mauro da Silva (Department of Physiology, PhD Student, Final presentation)

TBA

Department of Physiology

Monday, 20th August 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Luke Worthington (Department of Physiology, PhD student, 1-year presentation)

TBA

Department of Physiology

Monday, 3rd September 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Professor Heather Drummond (Medical University of Mississippi)

TBA

Department of Physiology

Monday, 10th September 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Elodie Desroziers(Department of Physiology)

TBA

Department of Physiology

Monday, 24th September 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Assoc Prof Ping Liu (Department of Anatomy)

TBA

Department of Physiology

Monday, 15th October 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Professor Jennifer Raymond (Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University)

Department of Physiology Sir John Eccles Lecturer for 2018

Department of Physiology

Monday, 26th November 2018 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Catherine Blizzard (University of Tasmania)

TBA

Show all seminar events.

A summer research project is an excellent way to get a taste for what scientific research is like. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in carrying on with science beyond undergraduate level.

Xander Seymour - Summer Research Student 2010/2011