University of Otago.Department of Physiology.Department of Physiology.

Physiology TV

An overview of Physiology at the University of Otago.

News

23rd June, 2017

Two HRC Project Grants awarded to Physiology Professor

Congratulations to Professor Allan Herbison who is the recipient of two Health Research Council of NZ (HRC) Project Grants totalling almost $2.6 million.

12th May, 2017

Julia Gouws (MSc student) receives another accolade for her research

After being awarded 1st= for the School of Biomedical Sciences Dean’s Prize for best 2016/17 Summer Scholarship Report recently, Julia has received another prestigious award this week.

5th May, 2017

Physiology PhD students take home prizes at the School Symposium

he School of Biomedical Sciences (BMS) Postgraduate Symposium was held on 3-4 May at the Otago Museum, and once again, our students had great success at the event.

30th March, 2017

Physiology student wins School’s Prize for Best Summer Scholarship report

Congratulations to Julia Gouws (supervisor Dr Karl Iremonger) who was awarded 1st= for the School of Biomedical Sciences Dean’s Prize for best Summer Scholarship Report for 2016/17.

30th March, 2017

Department of Physiology staff continue to be involved in fantastic Lab in a Box initiative

Lab in a Box is a mobile science laboratory, built in a 20 foot shipping container. It comes fully equipped with both science “gear” and people. Researchers and students from around New Zealand (or indeed around the World) are involved in this fantast

Next Event

3rd July, 2017

Aaron Korpal (PhD Final presentation, Department of Physiology)

 
PhD Programme.

Seminars

Unless stated otherwise, Departmental Seminars are held in the Hercus D'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00 on the day specified.

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 3rd July 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Aaron Korpal (PhD Final presentation, Department of Physiology)

Mechanisms of the contribution of vasopressin to the development of hypertension

Hypertension (chronically-elevated blood pressure) is the most common chronic disease in New Zealand. Some hypertensive patients exhibit elevated plasma levels of the hormone vasopressin. This is paradoxical because vasopressin increases blood pressure through its pressor and antidiuretic effects, and so increased levels would be expected to exacerbate the development of hypertension. Our lab has previously shown that the activity of the neurons that secrete vasopressin is increased early in the development of hypertension in an inducible transgenic model of the disease (Cyp1a1-Ren2 rats). This study set out to investigate whether vasopressin contributes to the development of hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren2 rats, and to identify the neural mechanisms that drive increased vasopressin neuron activity in this condition

Department of Physiology

Monday, 10th July 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Danielle Schafer (MSc Final Presentation, Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 17th July 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Luis Gonano (Department of Physiology)

Phosphorylation of RyR2 by Protein Kinase G: functional effects and pharmacological implications.

Cardiac Ryanodine receptors (RyR2) are homo-tetrameric Ca++ ion channels located within the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane of cardiac myocytes and play a key role in excitation-contraction coupling and normal heart function. RyR2 channels can also open spontaneously resulting in SR Ca++ release between triggered beats (during diastole). The last phenomenon is known as Store Overload-Induced Ca++ Release (SOICR) given its dependence on SR Ca++ load. Other factor that affects SOICR occurrence is the intrinsic RyR2 functional state, which can be altered by the phosphorylation of specific Serine residues in RyR2 including Ser2808, Ser2030 and Ser2814.
I am investigating the effects promoted by Protein Kinase G (PKG)-dependent phosphorylation of the RyR2. The evidence from in vitro experiments suggest that the amino-acid residue Ser2808 of RyR2s can be phosphorylated by PKG, which increases the opening of these channels. However, these results do not provide in vivo evidence that PKG can phosphorylate RyR2 in cardiac myocytes. More importantly, they do not resolve the functional impact of PKG phosphorylation of RyR2 on SOICR and cardiac Ca2+ handling.

Department of Physiology

Monday, 24th July 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Louise Bicknell (Department of Pathology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 31st July 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

(i) Sajida Parveen & (ii) Eugene Saw (PhD 1-year presentations, Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 7th August 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Elliot Pilmore (MSc Final Presentation, Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 14th August 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Kate Thomas (Surgical Sciences, Department of Medicine)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 21st August 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Professor Sharad Kumar (Centre for Cancer Biology, University of New South Wales)

Membrane and Ion Transport Focus Group speaker
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Department of Physiology

Monday, 11th September 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Professor Alison Heather (Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 18th September 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Karl Iremonger (Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 30th October 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Alexander Tups (Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 6th November 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Rebecca Campbell (Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 13th November 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Steven Condliffe (Department of Physiology)

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Show all seminar events.

Setting out every morning to hunt for the unknown - and finding it! What could be more fascinating?

Michel Herde - PhD Student