University of Otago.Department of Physiology.Department of Physiology.

Physiology TV

An overview of Physiology at the University of Otago.

News

14th August, 2017

Professor Colin Brown recognised by the British Society for Neuroendocrinology (BSN)

Prof Brown has been awarded the 2017 Mortyn Jones Memorial Medal, which is awarded annually by the BSN.

19th July, 2017

Congratulations to Daniel Barth, PhD

Our congratulations go to Daniel Barth on making the Health Sciences Divisional List of Exceptional Doctoral theses.

17th July, 2017

Associate Professor Ruth Empson awarded 2-year Neurological Foundation of NZ Project Grant

Congratulations to Associate Professor Ruth Empson who has been awarded a 2-year project grant ($193,844) for her project "Chloride Co-Transport - a Driving Force for Treating Human Cerebellar Ataxias”.

29th June, 2017

Winner of OMSRS Research Staff Speaker Awards from the Department of Physiology

Dr Carol Bussey was announced as the winner of 2017 Research Staff speaker award at the 239th Scientific Meeting of the Otago School of Medicine Research Society on 28th June.

23rd June, 2017

Two HRC Project Grants awarded to Physiology Professor

Congratulations to Professor Allan Herbison who is the recipient of two Health Research Council of NZ (HRC) Project Grants totalling almost $2.6 million.

Next Event

25th August, 2017

Professor Bjorn Knollman (Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville)

 
PhD Programme.

Seminars

Unless stated otherwise, Departmental Seminars are held in the Hercus D'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00 on the day specified.

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Department of Physiology

Friday, 25th August 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 2.00 p.m.

Professor Bjorn Knollman (Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville)

Modeling Heart Disease with Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells – Challenges and Progress

Prof Knollmann's laboratory is interested in the biology of cardiac arrhythmias. Using genetically-altered mice as model systems, ongoing research examines several key pathways of arrhythmias and sudden death in humans: 1) Impaired cardiac calcium cycling and mutations in cardiac Ca2+ handling proteins, 2) Troponin T mutations associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 3) Mutations associated with the congenital long QT syndrome. In neither case the mechanisms that lead to sudden cardiac death are fully understood. His laboratory performs comprehensive studies from the molecular level to the whole animal in each mouse model in order to better understand the mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis. For example, single cell patch-clamp, intracellular calcium and cell shortening measurements, whole-heart electro-physiology and contractility measurements, and in vivo electrocardiogram and hemodynamic studies are performed. His research may identify therapeutic strategies, which then can be tested in the same model system prior to human studies.

Department of Physiology

Friday, 1st September 2017 - Castle 1 Lecture Theatre at 5.30 p.m.

Professor Joseph Takahashi (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center)

The 24 hour clock in our DNA

Professor Takahashi’s research has provided some of the most important and groundbreaking discoveries in the field of circadian rhythm research, including he isolation and cloning of the first mammalian circadian rhythm gene in mice in 1997, appropriately named the Clock gene.

Department of Physiology

Monday, 11th September 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Jim Elliott, William Evans Visiting Fellow (Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago)

Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Spinal Cord and Skeletal Muscle in Whiplash...have we found the biology of whiplash?

My research is focused on understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the transition from acute to chronic pain following whiplash injury. Specifically, I utilise structural and advanced magnetic resonance imaging applications to quantify the temporal development of altered spinal cord physiology and muscle degeneration as potential cellular and molecular substrates of persistent pain-related disability.

Department of Physiology

Monday, 18th September 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Karl Iremonger (Department of Physiology)

Neural signatures of stress

Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons control the neuroendocrine stress response. CRH neurons are activated in response to many different types of stress and in turn release neuropeptides both within the brain and into the circulation to control the body’s stress response. Our lab uses electrophysiology, imaging and other techniques to understand how CRH neural circuits are regulated. We are specifically interested in determining the activity patterns of these neurons and how they adapt across different physiological and behavioural states.

Department of Physiology

Monday, 2nd October 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Jenny Clarkson (Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 9th October 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Javier Jimenez Martin (1-yr PhD Presentation, Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 16th October 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Belinda Cridge (Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 30th October 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Alexander Tups (Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 6th November 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Rebecca Campbell (Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 13th November 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Professor Alison Heather (Department of Physiology)

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Department of Physiology

Monday, 11th December 2017 - Hercus d'Ath Lecture Theatre at 13:00.

Dr Fenja Knopp (Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany)

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Show all seminar events.

My Summer Research Scholarship in the Department of Physiology was the highlight of my time at the University of Otago as I learnt many new skills, including how to carry out scientific research in a controlled manner, collecting and analyzing scientific data in an orderly fashion, and most importantly, learning to read and think critically.

Aye Thaung - Summer Research Student 2010/2011