University of Otago.Department of Physiology.Department of Physiology.

Bahn Lab

Dr Andrew Bahn

Andrew Bahn

Senior Lecturer

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 4797314
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: andrew.bahn@otago.ac.nz

Member of Membrane & Ion Transport.

Research interests

My main research topic is the renal organic anion transport. Organic anions (OA) are substances, which possess a negative charge under physiological conditions. This class of substances includes a wide array of endogenous as well as exogenous compounds such as neurotransmitter metabolites, urate or prostaglandins, anti-viral drugs, antibiotics, analgesics or ochratoxin A, to name just a few. The kidney is the organ that facilitates secretion of these substances into the urine. Transport proteins involved in the secretion process of OA are members of the so called solute carrier family 22A (SLC22A). In recent years I was involved in the cloning and functional characterisation of organic anion transporters (OAT) of the SLC22A family.

Urate is the end product of purine metabolism in higher primates and well known as the substance causing gout. It has come back into clinical focus because of new studies supporting its impact on cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, we have demonstrated that transporters such as organic anion transporter 4 (OAT4) or OAT10 are not only capable of urate transport, but they are also involved in renal secretion of anti-hypertensive drugs such as diuretics (furosemide or torasemide) or thiazides (hydrochlorothiazide) and even the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A. We provided evidence that OAT4 as well as OAT10 exchange these drugs during secretion against urate and are consequently involved in the hyperuricemic effect of these commonly used diuretics, thiazides and cyclosporine A (Hagos et al. 2007a; Hagos et al. 2007b; Bahn et al. 2008).

Transporters currently known to play a significant role in determining urate plasma levels are URAT1, OAT4, ABCG2 and glucose transporter 9 (GLUT9). My main current interest is the post-transcriptional regulation of these urate transporters, especially GLUT9 in general and under different stress conditions.

Research topics

Current funding

Lab personnel

Paris Brocherie

Paris Brocherie

Ethan Cain

Ethan Cain

Manu Futi

Manu Futi

Devon Nolan

Devon Nolan

Nima Purvis

Nima Purvis

Claire Twyman

Claire Twyman


Selected publications

Teaching

Paris Brocherie

Paris Brocherie

BBBiomedSc (Hons)

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 479 4215
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: bropa750@student.otago.ac.nz

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Ethan Cain

Ethan Cain

MSc Student

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 479 4215
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: caiet395@student.otago.ac.nz

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Manu Futi

Manu Futi

PGDipSci Student

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 479 7316
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: futtu375@student.otago.ac.nz

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Devon Nolan

Devon Nolan

BBBiomedSc (Hons)

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 479 4215
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: nolde004@student.otago.ac.nz

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Nima Purvis

Nima Purvis

PhD Student

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 470 3417
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: purni733@student.otago.ac.nz

Thesis topic: Pathophysiology role of microRNAs in cardiac stem cells in regeneration of the diseased heart

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Claire Twyman

Claire Twyman

BBiomedSc (Hons)

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 479 4215
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: twycl239@student.otago.ac.nz

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Physiology is the stepchild of medicine. That is why Cinderella often turns out the queen.

Martin H. Fischer