University of Otago.Department of Physiology.Department of Physiology.

Hamilton Lab

Dr Kirk Hamilton

Kirk Hamilton

Senior Lecturer

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 4797252
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: kirk.hamilton@otago.ac.nz

Member of Membrane & Ion Transport.

Member of The Kidney in Health and Disease Research Theme, Auckland Kidney Physiome Project - Auckland Bioengineering Institute and Gut Health Network.

Research interests

My main research interest is the molecular regulation, physiology and function of ion channels of epithelial tissues. My research is focused on the molecular regulation and trafficking of K+ channels, in particular, the human intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel, KCa3.1 and the one transmembrane domain K+ channels β-subunits KCNE1 and KCNE3. We are using biotin-ligase acceptor peptide (BLAP) technology to tagged K+ channels in order to examine their cellular and membrane fate. We hope to further understand the role of KCa3.1 in cell biology.

A new research avenue has emerged from collaboration with members of the Auckland Bioengineering Institute in which we are developing mathematical modeling approaches to understand the function of the nephron. The goal of this research is to develop a framework for the comprehensive model description of biophysically detailed multi-scale physiological model of multi-nephron complex.

In the past, we have examined the effects of benzimidazolones (1-EBIO, DCEBIO), psoralens (methoxsalen), genistein, and imidazole antibiotics (clotrimazole) as pharmacological modulators of KCa3.1 in epithelia. These agents will be useful in pharmacological therapy of diseases such as renal fibrosis, colitis, antherogenesis and regulation of blood pressure, for example.

I employ electrophysiological (patch-clamp and short circuit current measurements) and molecular biochemical techniques (immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, co-immunoprecipitation, cell surface immunoprecipitation, gel electrophoresis, biotinylation, PCR) to address basic questions of cell physiology and biology of ion channels.

Research topics

Current funding

Previous funding

Collaborators

Lab personnel

Joshua April

Joshua April

Rachel Farquhar

Rachel Farquhar

Elliot Pilmore

Elliot Pilmore

Monique Scott

Monique Scott


Current students

Previous students

Selected publications

Edited Book

Hamilton K.L. Senior Editor and Devor D.C., Co-Editor. Ion channels and Transporters in Health and Disease. 29 Chapters, Springer-Verlag, ISBN: pp. xxx, In Press. (2015).

Journal publications

Book chapters

Presentations

Teaching

Joshua April

Joshua April

PGDipSci Student

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 479 7316
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: aprjo818@student.otago.ac.nz

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Rachel Farquhar

Rachel Farquhar

Assistant Research Fellow

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 479 7315
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: farra956@student.otago.ac.nz

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Elliot Pilmore

Elliot Pilmore

MSc Student

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 479 7316
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: pilel408@student.otago.ac.nz

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Monique Scott

Monique Scott

PGDipSci

Department of Physiology
Otago School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone: 479 7316
Fax: +64 3 479 7323

Email: scomo001@student.otago.ac.nz

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Physiology is the stepchild of medicine. That is why Cinderella often turns out the queen.

Martin H. Fischer