University of Otago.Department of Physiology.Department of Physiology.

Physiology TV

An overview of Physiology at the University of Otago.

News

9th February, 2018

Dahlia based diabetes drug developed by Physiology researcher ready for human trials

In partnership with Plant and Food Research, researchers will soon begin human trials of a drug made from dahlias.

9th January, 2018

Otago breakthrough in diabetic heart disease

The molecule responsible for heart disease in diabetics has been identified by University of Otago researchers, greatly improving chances of survival.

13th November, 2017

Otago study could mean hope for infertile couples

Crucial new information about how the brain controls fertility has been unlocked by University of Otago researchers, with their findings just published in prestigious journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

13th November, 2017

Phenomenal success for Physiology researchers in latest Marsden funding round

Four 3-year project grants were awarded to Department of Physiology researchers in this year’s Marsden Fund - totalling over $3.8M.

25th October, 2017

Charlotte Steel, BSc (Hons) NEUR student in the Department has gained a Cambridge Rutherford Memorial PhD Scholarship

Our congratulations to Charlotte who is currently completing a BSc (Hons) degree in Neuroscience in the Department of Physiology with supervisor Assoc Prof Phil Sheard.

Next Event

26th February, 2018

Rachel Lund (1-yr PhD Presentation)

 
PhD Programme.

News

19th July, 2017

Congratulations to Daniel Barth, PhD

Congratulations to Daniel Barth, PhD

Our congratulations go to Daniel Barth on making the Health Sciences Divisional List of Exceptional Doctoral theses.

Daniel's research (supervisor Dr Martin Fronius) focused on the characterisation of mechanosensitive ion channels that play important roles in blood pressure regulation and pain sensation. The activity of these mechanosensitive ion channels can be regulated by mechanical forces such as shear force (e.g., caused by blood flow). We found that the epithelial sodium channel requires a connection to the extracellular matrix to sense shear force. In addition, for the first time we provide evidence that the acid-sensing ion channel is a mechanosensitive channel that can be directly regulated by shear force.

It's fun getting your hands into the job, e.g. doing experiments on a beating heart. Suddenly all those theories you have been learning about, are made real!

Juliet Kane - BSc (Physiology) student