University of Otago.Department of Physiology.Department of Physiology.

Physiology TV

An overview of Physiology at the University of Otago.

News

9th January, 2018

Otago breakthrough in diabetic heart disease

The molecule responsible for heart disease in diabetics has been identified by University of Otago researchers, greatly improving chances of survival.

13th November, 2017

Otago study could mean hope for infertile couples

Crucial new information about how the brain controls fertility has been unlocked by University of Otago researchers, with their findings just published in prestigious journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

13th November, 2017

Phenomenal success for Physiology researchers in latest Marsden funding round

Four 3-year project grants were awarded to Department of Physiology researchers in this year’s Marsden Fund - totalling over $3.8M.

25th October, 2017

Charlotte Steel, BSc (Hons) NEUR student in the Department has gained a Cambridge Rutherford Memorial PhD Scholarship

Our congratulations to Charlotte who is currently completing a BSc (Hons) degree in Neuroscience in the Department of Physiology with supervisor Assoc Prof Phil Sheard.

8th September, 2017

PhD student wins two awards at Queenstown Research Week

Congratulations to Mauro Silva, PhD student in the Department of Physiology. Mauro is supervised by Dr Rebecca Campbell.

Next Event

22nd January, 2018

Dr. rer. nat. Fenja Knopp (Excellence Cluster Cardio-Pulmonary System, Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany)

 
PhD Programme.

News

17th July, 2017

Associate Professor Ruth Empson awarded 2-year Neurological Foundation of NZ Project Grant

Associate Professor Ruth Empson awarded 2-year Neurological Foundation of NZ Project Grant

Congratulations to Associate Professor Ruth Empson who has been awarded a 2-year project grant ($193,844) for her project "Chloride Co-Transport - a Driving Force for Treating Human Cerebellar Ataxias”.

Ataxia, or loss of controlled movement, occurs when the electrical signals in a part of your brain called the cerebellum go wrong. Ataxia affects young or old, has a variety of causes, usually gets worse, is rarely reversible and very poorly treated. In this collaborative project our hope is to uncover a novel therapeutic mechanism to correct the wayward electrical signals as a promising way to restore cerebellar function and effortless movement control in ataxic humans. The project uniquely harnesses human tissue studies through collaboration with Associate Professor Maurice Curtis and the resources of the NZ Neurological Foundation Douglas Human Brain Bank and other Brain Banks around the world, coupled with highly specific medicinal chemistry, electrophysiological assessment of chloride transporter function and behavioural studies of motor performance in an excellent mouse model of human ataxia.

I love it how we are learning cutting edge research from people who are top in the world in their field of research.

Juliet Kane - BSc (Physiology) student