University of Otago.Department of Physiology.Department of Physiology.

Physiology TV

An overview of Physiology at the University of Otago.

News

14th August, 2017

Professor Colin Brown recognised by the British Society for Neuroendocrinology (BSN)

Prof Brown has been awarded the 2017 Mortyn Jones Memorial Medal, which is awarded annually by the BSN.

19th July, 2017

Congratulations to Daniel Barth, PhD

Our congratulations go to Daniel Barth on making the Health Sciences Divisional List of Exceptional Doctoral theses.

17th July, 2017

Associate Professor Ruth Empson awarded 2-year Neurological Foundation of NZ Project Grant

Congratulations to Associate Professor Ruth Empson who has been awarded a 2-year project grant ($193,844) for her project "Chloride Co-Transport - a Driving Force for Treating Human Cerebellar Ataxias”.

29th June, 2017

Winner of OMSRS Research Staff Speaker Awards from the Department of Physiology

Dr Carol Bussey was announced as the winner of 2017 Research Staff speaker award at the 239th Scientific Meeting of the Otago School of Medicine Research Society on 28th June.

23rd June, 2017

Two HRC Project Grants awarded to Physiology Professor

Congratulations to Professor Allan Herbison who is the recipient of two Health Research Council of NZ (HRC) Project Grants totalling almost $2.6 million.

Next Event

25th August, 2017

Professor Bjorn Knollman (Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville)

 
PhD Programme.

News

3rd March, 2017

Physiology researcher awarded Lottery Health Research Project Grant

Physiology researcher awarded Lottery Health Research Project Grant

Congratulations to Associate Professor Rajesh Katare who was awarded a research project grant of $88,246 over two years.

The project (with Associate Investigator Professor Michael Williams from the Department of Medicine) is entitled “Circulating microRNAs as prognostic indicator of ischemic heart disease”.

Patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease (IHD) require regular follow-up to monitor progression of the disease and response to treatment. Currently, apart from echocardiography which requires patients visiting a specialty centre which is expensive, there is no other test available to precisely monitor the heart function during regular follow-up. In this study, they aim to test whether changes in the level of circulating microRNAs reflect changes in heart function, thereby making them a potent independent prognostic marker to understand progression of IHD. Results from this study will confirm the specificity and sensitivity of the circulating microRNAs in accurately reflecting the functional state of the diseased heart. In long term, this could result in the development of a novel biomarker assay to test the prognosis of IHD.

My interest in Physiology was aroused while doing PHSL345 as part of my 300-level papers. I was intrigued by how little is known about how the human body works under normal and pathological conditions.

Aye Thaung - BBiomedSc (Functional Human Biology) student