University of Otago.Department of Physiology.Department of Physiology.

Physiology TV

An overview of Physiology at the University of Otago.

News

8th September, 2017

PhD student wins two awards at Queenstown Research Week

Congratulations to Mauro Silva, PhD student in the Department of Physiology. Mauro is supervised by Dr Rebecca Campbell.

8th September, 2017

Triennial Medal awarded to Professor Colin Brown

Congratulations to Colin who as been chosen by the Physiological Society of NZ (PSNZ) to be the recipient of the NZ Triennial Medal.

28th August, 2017

Dr Andrew Bahn awarded Arthritis NZ Project Grant

Congratulations to Dr Bahn who has been awarded a $60K grant for his project “Identification of oxypurinol transporters to decipher drug-drug interactions in gout treatment”.

25th August, 2017

Congratulations to Lorna Daniels, PhD

Lorna Daniels’ PhD thesis has made the Health Sciences Divisional List of Exceptional Doctoral theses.

14th August, 2017

Professor Colin Brown recognised by the British Society for Neuroendocrinology (BSN)

Prof Brown has been awarded the 2017 Mortyn Jones Memorial Medal, which is awarded annually by the BSN.

Next Event

30th October, 2017

Dr Alexander Tups (Department of Physiology)

 
PhD Programme.

News

26th May, 2011

Physiology PhD student award Exceptional PhD thesis

Congratulations to Carissa Murrell, PhD student co-supervised by Dr Phil Ainslie (Department of Physiology) and Dr Jim Cotter (School of Physical Education).

Carissa recently completed the examination aspects of her PhD thesis, and her thesis has been placed on the Division of Health Sciences List of Exceptional PhD Theses, a very prestigious accolade. A thesis is of exceptional quality when all three examiners of a candidate's thesis agree that the thesis is of an exceptional standard in every respect (research content, originality, quality of expression and accuracy of presentation) and is amongst the top 10% of theses examined, and we are very proud of Carissa's success. Well done!

Carissa's thesis is entitled Effects of Age, Fitness, and Exercise on the Control of Cerebral Blood Flow. Her research focused on the effects of age, fitness, and exercise on the control of blood flow to the brain. A compromised control of cerebral blood flow can result in syncope (fainting) and is a risk factor for cerebrovascular disease (e.g., stroke). Two major controllers of cerebral blood flow are blood pressure and blood carbon dioxide. Furthermore, age, fitness, and exercise all affect cerebral blood flow and its control. In her first study, Carissa assessed the control of cerebral blood flow in response to acute changes in blood pressure (due to a change in posture) in young and older trained and untrained individuals at rest and following exercise. In her second study, Carissa assessed the effect of 12 weeks of exercise training on the control of cerebral blood flow in response to changes in carbon dioxide at rest and during exercise in young and older individuals.

Carissa's thesis will be available online through the University library website in the coming weeks.

The Physiology Department's staff are so approachable and genuinely happy to help. Having lecturers be so positive and excited about their work makes study so much easier!

Allie Finlay - BSc (Physiology) student